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posted by Joe on Monday, December 07, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Wow... Bixi continues to impress with their new Bixi Boutique. Can't figure out what to get someone in Montreal for Christmas? How about a monthly or yearly pass to the hottest piece of cycling infrastructure this side of the Atlantic?

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posted by Joe on Thursday, November 19, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

A CUPE local in Ottawa has negotiated a bicycling travel allowance:


Members of CUPE 3942 who work as mental health and social services workers at the Ottawa Salus Corporation have bargained what is a first for a CUPE Local: a bicycling travel allowance. A section of the Local’s Collective Agreement that deals with expenses now allows for members to file claims for travelling by bicycle. Specifically, the language states:

An employee who has travelled by bicycle for work purposes in excess of 100 kilometres between April 1st and October 31st may claim an allowance of $0.20/km to a maximum of fifty dollars ($50.00) towards the upkeep of such bicycle and related safety equipment. Such claim itemizing bicycle journeys will be made by November 30th of each year.

While this rate of reimbursement falls short of what is granted for private motor vehicle use, it is still a bold step in legitimizing bicycles for work transportation purposes. Ottawa is one of Canada’s more bike-friendly communities. Members of Local 3942 will certainly benefit from this extension of allowances to a green form of transportation.

CUPE's website has some good pointers on making "green" transportation a priority for workplaces:


Transportation to, from and during work has a huge environmental impact. For example, single-occupancy driving day-in and day-out for work is not a green practice. Likewise, work-related air travel negatively impacts the climate.

There are greener transportation choices available, such as using public transit, bicycling, walking, carpooling, car-sharing, low-emission vehicles and other options. Green collective agreement provisions to support more environmental transportation would cover financial incentives and disincentives and support programs, such as:

* Employer-provided/supported public transit passes.
* Employer-provided/supported shoe allowances for workers who walk to work.
* Employer-provided/supported bicycle lock-up, showering facilities and flexible work schedules for bicycle commuters.
* Grants or loans to employees for bicycle purchases.
* Reimbursement for work-related bicycling kilometrage.
* Car-sharing schemes.
* Financial disincentives, such as employees paying for parking spaces for single-occupancy drivers.
* Employer-purchased legitimate carbon offsets for workers who must travel by air.

UNISON – a British trade union – has been very active in helping to develop Green Staff Travel Plans for its members that build on many of these points.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, October 21, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Want to know what's possible with bikelanes in a big city like Toronto? Look no further than New York (a much bigger city) for some inspiration. It doesn't take miracles to get cycling infrastructure like this... just political guts. :)




Bike lanes: In some cities people are literally dying to have them and some people go so far as to mark their own. Here in New York City, it feels like every time I get on my bike there is a new bike lane - sometimes on the left, sometimes buffered, and sometimes completely separated from automobile traffic. To understand these lanes, I had the opportunity to go for a ride with the NYC DOT bicycle boys. They explained the classes of bike lanes and showed off some of these inventive facilities. You can use Ride the City to find a safe bike route in New York City and watch this video to see what lanes are used on your route.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, October 14, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Nice article about Copenhagen "bike life" in today's Globe and Mail:

"It took time and political courage. But today, Copenhagen is an example to cities seeking to develop a bicycle culture of their own"

http://v1.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20091014.BCMASON14ART2259/TPStory/TPComment/

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, October 06, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Roger Geller, Bicycle Coordinator in Portland's Office of Transportation will be in Toronto on October 21st. TCAT, in partnership with the Toronto Cyclists Union and the US Consulate General in Toronto, is happy to present a free public event to hear first-hand how Portland became the first major city in America to be designated as a Platinum-level Bicycle Friendly Community.

TCAT is promising more details soon.

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posted by Joe on Monday, September 28, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Awesome video and post from Streetsblog of bikelanes down the middle of Sands Street in NYC... where they replaced some unused road space with lanes!



Chalk up more bikeway innovation to the folks at the NYC Department of Transportation. Nearly complete, the Sands Street approach to the Manhattan Bridge is now safer and more enjoyable thanks to a New York City first: a center-median, two-way protected bike path. The facility is a perfect solution to counter the dangers posed by a tangle of roads and highway on-ramps that burden the area. Dramatic before-and-afters tell the delicious story.

More at Streetsblog

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Originally posted in the Forum:

Nice article in Streetsblog:SF about how cyclists deal with streetcar tracks... Toronto is mentioned as we have some railway tracks with firm rubber flanges (that contract under the weight of a train, but not under a bicycle) and Yvonne Bambrick of the Bike Union is quoted too:

In Toronto, where bicyclists also have to contend with a maze of tracks, several at-grade railroad crossings are equipped with a rubber flange filler that is jammed down into the cracks of trolley tracks. The rubber is firm enough that it doesn't compress when a bike passes over it, but when a streetcar comes it squishes down and doesn't cause the train to derail.
Read more and discuss in the Forum.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Originally posted on the Forum:

Very nice post on The Urban Country about Montreal's new Bixi system, from the point of view of a tourist from Toronto:

The $15 million BIXI program – the largest of its kind in North America - consists of 300 bicycle stations scattered around downtown Montreal; supplying 3000 bicycles that are available to anyone with a working credit card. A BIXI user can purchase a membership for $5/day, $28/month, or $78/year. The membership entitles the rider to unlimited use of the BIXI system, providing the first 30-minutes of each trip for free. Additional charges only apply if the bicycle is used for more than 30-minutes at a time. Like Paris’ Vélib’ system - which offers 20,000 bicycles at 1,450 stations - it encourages users to take short trips to increase the user capacity.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Originally posted in the Forum:

This is a crazy story... an Asheville N.C. firefighter shoots a cyclist in the head because he is biking with a child on a busy roadway. Thankfully the cyclists helmet stops the bullet.

Officers said the victim was riding with his wife and had his 3-year-old son in a child seat attached to his bicycle when a driver approached him.

Police said the driver, Charles Diez, claimed he was upset that the victim was bike riding with his child on the heavily traveled Tunnel Road.

Diez pulled a gun and opened fire, hitting the victim in his bicycle helmet, according to police.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Originally posted in the Forum:

When New York City opened up new pedestrian zones in the heart of Midtown this summer, naysayers predicted a traffic nightmare. Nearly two months later, we're still waiting for the much-feared Carmaggedon.

In this video, Streetfilms funder Mark Gorton takes us on a tour of Broadway's car-free squares and boulevard-style blocks, where conditions have improved dramatically for pedestrians, cyclists, and, yes, delivery truck drivers.

Watch video on StreetFilms.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, July 29, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cyclists fuming over biker lane-share push

Cyclists and bikers have clashed over a call for motorcyclists to trial using bicycle lanes.

Motorcycling Australia has called for the trial as an attempt to stem the rate of biker crashes and deaths over the past few years.

However, Bicycle Queensland manager Ben Wilson said the speed differential between bicycles and motorcycles "knocks this on the head" and would prove dangerous for cyclists.

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, July 21, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

From CTV: One of 5 cyclists in hit and run clinging to life

One of the five Ottawa-area cyclists seriously injured in a hit-and-run accident Sunday morning remains in critical condition after being struck by a minivan in the Ottawa suburb of Kanata.

Robert Wein, 36, was the most seriously injured and suffered severe brain trauma. He is a father of two and a triathlete who completed a half-Ironman triathlon last weekend. He has not regained consciousness and remains in critical condition.

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, May 19, 2009 Share/Save/Bookmark

Matt Blackett of Spacing visited Copenhagen recently, and being impressed with both the cycling infrastructure and numbers of cyclists there, made an animation of cyclists from photos taken during one traffic light cycle:



View the Spacing post for some great comments about it.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, October 08, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Those of you who follow the BikingToronto Links Blog, may have noticed something this morning about Copenhagen's "Green Wave" - a strategy by that city to co-ordinate traffic lights with the average speed of cyclists. (that link also describes the efforts by the city to restrict cars from the Nørrebrogade, a major street popular with cyclists).

Copenhagenize decided to check out the Green Wave, and filmed it for us:


The Green Wave in Copenhagen from Colville Andersen on Vimeo.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, June 25, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week.

I post all interesting Elsewhere Links as well as lots of Bike News from Other Cities over on the Links Page.

Bikes + Buses in Chicago

Last Friday, at the end of Chicago's Bike to Work Week, Mayor Daley made an interesting proposition at the week's culminating rally; bikes should share the bus lanes on downtown streets to accommodate the surge in bike traffic.

Manhattan to Enjoy 6.9 Mile Temporary Car-Free Route

While the Mayor of New York Michael Bloomberg may have failed to get his plans for a congestion charge approved, he's not stopping the fight for liveable streets just yet. His latest plan is to create a temporary 6.9 mile car-free route from...

California: Bike Boulevards Coming to Long Beach

The Long Beach Press-Telegram reports that Long Beach officials are planning two new bike boulevards for the city. While the routes aren't set yet, we do know that there will be one north-south route and one east-west route.

Danish IKEA Intros Fleet Of Trailer Bikes To Get Those Flatpacks Home

After a survey found that 20 percent of its customers arrived by bike, the IKEA outside of Copenhagen has hooked up with the Danish Freetrailer service to offer (relatively free) Velorbis bikes with trailers to customers.

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posted by Joe on Friday, June 20, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Things are happening in Montreal... their upcoming "Public Bike System" (or PBS) has a fancy new website, a name contest, and plans to start with 40 public bikes this fall and expanding to 2,400 in a year:

The first city-issue self-serve bikes are to appear at specially designed outdoor stations in fall 2008. By autumn 2009, it's expected 2,400 bikes will be available for as little as $1 per half-hour, at 300 stations around central neighbourhoods.

The idea is to encourage Montrealers and tourists to use the public bicycles instead of cars for short, inner-city trips. Users will be able to pick up a bike at one station, use it, then drop it off at any station of their choice.


Oh, and the bikes look awesome... which makes sense since the aesthetics of the system were designed by Michel Dallaire.

You may be asking yourself "How are they paying for this?" and the answer is easy:

The city has chosen Stationnement Montréal, a subsidiary of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal, to run the bike rental system, partly because the company's automated parking meters are similar to those needed for the self-serve bike scheme.

The company, which manages the city's paid on-street and public parking lots, is to invest

$15 million to get the project going, although it is expected to eventually be self-financing.


That's right... Montreal's equivalent to the Toronto Parking Authority is running this.

Is there any reason this can't be done in Toronto?

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, June 18, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week.

I post all interesting Elsewhere Links as well as lots of Bike News from Other Cities over on the Links Page.

NYC: Mayor Bloomberg & Friends Announce "Saturday Streets"

Essentially the plan opens Park Avenue to pedestrians and cyclists from 72nd thru to the Brooklyn Bridge (using other connectors) on August 9th, 16th, and 23rd from 7 AM to 1 PM!

Obama: I'll Boost Funds for Bike-Ped Projects If Elected

Barack Obama, in a private 20-minute meeting with members of the Bikes Belong board of directors, told them if he were elected president he would increase funding for cycling and pedestrian projects. And the presumptive Democratic presidential nominee als

USA: Obama bicycle meeting was "a coming of age moment"

"I've been doing the bike policy stuff forever, but, in the last 30 days," he said, "I feel like more has happened than in the last 30 yrs."

Cycling Saves Australia $200 million in Health Costs

The study, Cycling: Getting Australia Moving, funded by the Australian government and prepared by Melbourne University and the Cycling Promotion Fund concluded that thanks to the increased health of cyclists, public health services are spared an estimated

NYC: Car-Free Saturdays Will Open Path For Peds and Bikes From City Hall to 72nd

On three Saturday mornings in August, the Department of Transportation will ban cars from nearly 5 miles of city streets to make way for cyclists, joggers and walkers.

Man on a bike is tackled, then tasered by Portland Police

A Portland man says he was tackled, pushed off his bike, and then tasered repeatedly by a Portland Police officer in Southeast Portland last night because he didn't have a front light on his bike.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week.

I post all interesting Elsewhere Links as well as lots of Bike News from Other Cities over on the Links Page.

NYC Bicyclists Get Their Own MapQuest

The good old New York City Bike Map is about to face some stiff competition. On Sunday, three enterprising cyclists launched "Ride the City," a web site that finds the safest and most efficient routes for those on two wheels.

Taking a Ride, with a Couple Thousand Friends, by the LA River

Yesterday marked the 8th Los Angeles River Ride. Thousands of cyclists, riders and even some Ridazz gathered at Griffith Park to go on organized rides of 10, 50, 70 or 100 miles.

Bells ring in Portland's first Blessing of the Bikes

In a respectful and poignant outdoor ceremony, St. Mary's Cathedral in Northwest Portland held their first-ever Blessing of the Bikes on Sunday.

CNN: "My Next Vehicle Will Be a Bicycle"

In the non-random sample of 42,275 respondents, more people said they are leaning towards a bike than a truck or SUV.

TreeHugger: Obama Wraps Up Nomination, Celebrates By Riding His Bike

This bit of news should erase any doubt left that Obama would be sympathetic to cause of cyclists. Then again, President Bush is known to be an avid cyclist, yet to our knowledge he hasn't gone out of his way to promote cycling for recreation or transport

Australia: Cyclists want protected bicycle lanes

Bicycle Victoria wants to see bicycle lanes with a higher level of protection than just a white line trialled on some routes in Melbourne

Governors Island to Serve as Testing Ground for NYC Bike-Share

Turns out the wait for free bikes will be a lot shorter. Starting this week, 250 bikes at the island's rental outfit, Bike and Roll, will be available to visitors at no charge on Fridays, thanks to sponsorship from Transportation Alternatives.

Kingston needs more bike lanes

While the City of Toronto is celebrating Bicycle Month and has plans to expand its 90 kilometres of bike lanes to 495 kilometres by 2011, city councillors in Kingston are delaying making decisions about this issue.

As gas prices soar, so does interest in bicycling in Massachusetts

Drivers clear a lane, bicyclists are taking to the road in record numbers in Massachusetts.

Cycle Fun Montreal: Bikes and local trains - the Montréal experience

Cycle Fun Montreal asks: The suburban train system: does it provide good access for urban cyclists to get to suburban/rural cycling destinations?

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, June 04, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week.

I also post all the Elsewhere Links I find over on the Links Page.

Bikes go mainstream with Today Show coverage

In recent weeks, there's been an unprecedented barrage of bike-related news stories in the mainstream media.

CNN: Car crashes into bike race; one dead

A car plowed into a weekend bike race along a highway near the U.S.-Mexico border, killing one and injuring 10 others, police said.

Columbus, Ohio Unveils 20-Year Bicycle Master Plan

There are also plans for a bike share program, the installation of more bike racks, the creation of several bike boulevards and significantly improved signage. Looks like nowadays cities of all geographies, political landscapes, and socio-economic...

Downtown LA Critical Mass

When your average person thinks of Critical Mass, they usually picture hundreds of colorfully dressed cyclists swarming the streets of a big city disrupting motor vehicle traffic. That’s exactly what last Friday’s “Downtown Critical Mass” was...

Portland: Governor Kulongoski will bike to work on Monday

He walked to work on Earth Day, and now Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski says he’ll ride his bike to the office on Monday.

UK: Higher fuel prices = cycling boom

A press release headed “Higher fuel prices = cycling boom” which boldly predicts that “an extra 1.25 million trips will be made by bicycle every day due to the rising price of petrol and diesel.”

Portland: Bikes, the ballet, and a best legs contest

The award for best event logo of the summer so far has to go to Bike to the Ballet — coming this June from the Portland-based Oregon Ballet Theater.

National Bike Bill passes U.S. House vote

The resolution recognizes the importance of bicycling to "enriching the nation's health, reducing traffic congestion and greenhouse gas emissions, and improving America's economic vitality and overall quality of life."

Springwise: Pedal-powered coffee retailer

Mobile coffee carts have been around for a while, including those from Dutch MobiCcino, which we covered back in 2006. But whereas most such carts are motorised, UK-based Bikecaffe has come up with a pedal-powered and eco-friendly alternative.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, May 28, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:


Montreal: 100 kilometres of new Montreal bike path in 2008

Some of these are new paths on major traffic arteries, like on Cote Ste-Catherine road. Some are connections between existing bike paths. But we are promised 100 new kilometres.

The Latest Innovation From Paris: Cargocycles

So what's the delivery truck equivalent of the bicycle? Look no further than Paris, the home of 20,000 shared bikes, and there you'll find La Petite Reine, a delivery company that utilizes a fleet of 60 Cargocycles.

Streetfilms: Tour de Brooklyn 2008

This year's event was moved a week early to coincide with the anniversary of the Brooklyn Bridge's 125th birthday. Among the highlights of the jaunt was a ride thru the Evergreen Cemetery and a very rare visit behind the gates of the Brooklyn Navy Yar

How to Make LA Bike Friendly

Two of Los Angeles' better known bike advocates and bloggers were busy writing about how to make Los Angeles a better place for bicyclists.

League launches Bicycle Friendly States program

Similar to their successful Bicycle Friendly Communities program this new campaign will look to "rank and recognize states that actively support bicycling."

Announcing Oregon Manifest; an event to celebrate handmade bikes, Portland-style

"The most original, spirited, and spectacle-laden boutique bike show in the nation."

Ghost Bikes: A Memorial to Cyclists

Ghost bikes are a spontaneous memorial to lost cyclists; they are old bikes painted white and locked near the crash site, accompanied by a small explanatory plaque. They serve as a message to those who pass by and a reminder of the need for safe cycling.

7 Ways Cities Can Make Your Bike More Secure

"Both sorts of stands are designed to make it easier to lock your bike more securely by locking both wheels and the frame to the stand and more difficult to lock you bike insecurely."

In Afghanistan, Bicycle Courier Service Provides Work For the Wounded

Because Kabul's streets are often clogged with vehicular traffic, security barriers and military convoys, bike messengers can get from place to place faster--and with far less hassle--than an automobile.

Portland: New bike/ped bridge over I-5 will connect to South Waterfront

The City of Portland is moving forward with their plans to build a new bike and pedestrian bridge over I-5 that will connect the Lair Hill neighborhood with the South Waterfront district near the Aerial Tram.

Coming Soon: A Major Car-Free Event in NYC

Speaking at Tuesday's Fit-City Conference, Transportation Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan announced that a Ciclovía-style car-free street event is in the works for this summer.

Portland Elects Cyclist Mayor; Obama Draws 8K Supporters on Bikes

On Tuesday, voters in Portland, Oregon elected Sam Adams as their next mayor. A former Congressional staffer and current Portland city commissioner, Adams -- who is a cyclist -- ran on a platform that emphasized environmental and progressive growth initia

Montreal's many bicycle co-ops

"I used to think that cycling was a solitary pastime. But lately I've come to realize, through taking long bike trips with roommates, watching gaggles of bike racers on TV, or working on my bike at a local bike co-op – that the best cycling experiences

Bike Boxes on (Brooklyn's) Broadway

Broadway now sports bike lanes, bike boxes, and pedestrian refuges with space for plantings. The changes have significantly narrowed the car travel lanes

Montreal: Six months on, de Maisonneuve bike path is going strong

"It's changed my life – or maybe at least preserved it… I'm talking about the newish (opened in November) bicycle path that runs along along de Maisonneuve Blvd. from the west end through downtown. After years of death-defying rides to work on Sherbro

285 Rides of Silence scheduled for today

Today marks the Ride of Silence that honors bicyclists who have died or been injured on public roads. It also raises awareness that we bicycle riders have a right to the road.

Portland, Beaverton will join annual Ride of Silence

They'll join nearly 300 cities worldwide taking part in the event which seeks to raise awareness of bicycles on the road by remembering those who have lost their lives on two wheels.

Sam Adams is Portland's next mayor

The big news is that bike-friendly Sam Adams has won the race for mayor with a decisive 52-34 victory over Sho Dozono.

Pedal-Powered Ecocabs Reach Streets Of Stockholm

The Ecocab, that jazzy three-wheeled improvement on the older pedicab/rickshaw idea, debuted the first of May in Toronto and has been seen in cities such as Dublin and in Berlin for last year's World Cup.

Bike Sharing Comes to America

A new bicycle sharing program in Washington DC provides subscribers with convenient, green rides. An annual $40 membership fee entitles SmartBike DC subscribers access to three hour blocks of emissions-free travel.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:

StreetFilms » National Bike To Work Day

Posted: 20 May 2008 01:24 PM CDT

Today's Streetfilm features Bike-to-Work Day in Austin, San Francisco, New York City and Portland, Oregon.

Vélib - The Movie

Posted: 16 May 2008 11:40 AM CDT

What better way to wrap up Semaine du Vélib' here on Copenhagen Cycle Chic than with a little video tribute.

LA: Bikes on the 405

Posted: 15 May 2008 12:46 PM CDT

thirty cyclists and rollerbladers make the case that every day should be Bike to Work Day by cruising down the 405 during rush hour. This video has higher production value than the first one. Graphics spell out the difference in speed between those biking

Portland: Man-eating streetcar tracks ahead

Posted: 15 May 2008 12:39 PM CDT


LA: This Morning at the Bicycle Blessing

Posted: 15 May 2008 09:18 AM CDT

A group of bicyclists gathered this morning at the Good Samaritan Hospital for the Blessing of the Bikes (remember the Blessing of the Animals?). It was one of many events taking place for Bike to Work Week.

Democrats and Republicans to Have Bike-sharing at Conventions

Posted: 15 May 2008 09:17 AM CDT

Bike-sharing will be "bike-partisan" at both of this year's Democratic and Republican National Conventions, showing that bicycling is "neither left, nor right, but ahead" to quote the Green Party's motto.

The Birth of Bike Culture - Vive la Vélib

Posted: 15 May 2008 09:15 AM CDT

I just spent three days in Paris and two of them were on Vélib' bikes. It was an astounding experience, even after hearing so many good things about it from afar. I've lived in Paris and have been a regular visitor for years so I was not a little amazed

Vélib - Sociable and Sustainable

Posted: 15 May 2008 09:13 AM CDT

One of the best things we noticed about cycling in Paris was that Parisians have understood how sociable cycling is. Cycling in couples is a common sight in Copenhagen and by all accounts Parisians have embraced this sociability as well.

Portland: Why are bicycles key to the future of Portland (and other cities)?

Posted: 14 May 2008 02:44 PM CDT

"Bicycling is the most equitable and affordable form of transportation… All of Portland's citizens already live within a 20-minute bicycle ride of our existing Regional and Town Centers and Commercial Main Streets."

Kicking-Off Bike Month

Posted: 13 May 2008 02:53 PM CDT

If you haven't heard yet, it is bike month in New York. This year over 200 rides, tours, and events are planned. To help kick things off, City Commissioners & Transportation Alternatives held a bike ride down 9th Avenue's protected bike lane and a pre

Snackin' & Schwag for Cyclists in Queens

Posted: 13 May 2008 02:53 PM CDT

If it's Bike Month, then Transportation Alternatives must be hosting their annual commuter pit stops with help from NYC DOT and the five Boro President's offices.

Portland earns a Platinum rating from the League of American Bicyclists

Posted: 13 May 2008 02:51 PM CDT

The League of American Bicyclists has awarded Portland it's highest honor, a Platinum rating. The city is the first major metro area to get the recognition. Davis, Calif., is the only other city to have the rating.

NYC: 5 Borough Bike Tour Video

Posted: 13 May 2008 12:39 PM CDT

Guided Bike Tours in Montreal

Posted: 13 May 2008 08:05 AM CDT

Exploring Montreal on bike is a great way to get to know our city. But if you don't know where to go, or you don't feel comfortable doing this alone or independently, a guided tour is a great way to go.


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posted by Joe on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:

Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, May 07, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:


Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:


Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:


Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 16, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



The Star looks at Bremen, Germany today as a city Toronto can look to for emulation.

At 52, [city planner] Glotz-Richter is his city's model commuter. He sets out most mornings cycling one kilometre to the train station from his suburban home. Like every station, his has weather-protected bike racks, where hundreds of commuters leave their wheels each day. (GO recently counted just 735 bikes parked across its 58 stations.)

Following a 20-minute train ride, Glotz-Richter picks up his second set of two wheels at Bremen's central station. Its 1,500 bike racks are housed on two levels, with video surveillance and smartcard access.

In 14 years of biking, Glotz-Richter says he's never had vandalism or theft. He wears raingear to keep his suit and tie dry in a drizzle.

"We have a shoe-polish machine in the bike station. These little details are not spectacular, but they're another part of the jigsaw puzzle" of reduced car reliance, says Glotz-Richter. Bankers and officials ride bikes in suits. "It has never been the poor man's mode of transport," he says. "The lower your social status, the more you depend on a car."


More at the Star.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 16, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 16, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Over in Paris, bike use has skyrocketed thanks to Mayor Bertrand Delanoë and JCDecaux' Velib, the bike renting system that lets people use bikes for 30 minutes for free and return them all over the city (it costs you if you keep the bike more than 30 minutes).

By the end of 2007 (6 months after Velib started), there were about 10,000 Velib bikes on the road, and trips by bicycle in Paris increased from 1% to 10 %.

The end of 2008 will see a total of about 20,000 bikes on the road,

More at the BikeSharing Blog, in their April Fool's post, which has accurate 2008 numbers, and hugely exagerated 2009 numbers. :)

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posted by Joe on Monday, April 14, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Is there such a thing as a "stupid" bikelane? This guy in Los Angeles thinks so, as the bikelane is only a block long.

I especially like the Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas music near the beginning, and the Super Mario death jingle near the end.




Can you think of any "less than intelligent" bikelanes here in Toronto?

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Drinking on the go, St. Louis style.


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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Monday, April 07, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Should we separate modes of traffic, or keep everyone together and let people learn to deal with one another?


When it was posted on bike promotion site TaketheTooker, a commenter complained "Misguided cyclists like bike lanes because they have the mistaken belief that they must “stay out of the way of cars.” No; it is the motorist’s responsibility to avoid hitting you, a rightful user of the road.....Why do we need all this extra paint and infrastructure when we can accomplish the same thing just by squashing this ridiculous notion that cyclists are somehow “second class” road users?" [TreeHugger]

Via Streetfilms, via TakeTheTooker, via TreeHugger :) It's all over, basically.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Google Maps is a handy-dandy little tool. It shows you maps of anywhere you want to go - in standard version, satellite images, and terrain maps, and you can find directions between two addresses, even saying "avoid highways" (which is useful to cyclists).

What it doesn't have is a "Bike-Friendly" Option, but an online petition hopes to change that:

The feature would take into account actual bicycle lanes from the locality being mapped, and it would automatically plan a route for a bicyclist, possibly even providing the cyclist options for either the most direct route, or the most bicycle-friendly (safest) route...

There are many reasons why this feature would be a wonderful edition to Google Maps. Among them, some of the most influential would be to:
  • Make bicycling safer for millions of bicyclists around the world.
  • Empower world citizens to better adapt their lifestyles to face the challenges of global climate change.
  • Help Google realize its core mission of 'organizing the world's information and making it universally accessible and useful.'

They've got almost 29,144 signatures so far. Add your name to them if you want.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Friday, March 07, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Yup, plows made especially for the bikelanes. I bet those little sidewalk tractors could do an alright job here in Toronto...

via TreeHugger.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Streetfilms has a cool feature called Cyclist of the Month. Their most recent one is about Mary Beth Kelly. Mary's husband was killed while they were out for a ride on a Greenway in Hudson River Park. Mary has since become a great cycling advocate in New York City:

In June 2006, she and her husband Dr. Carl Henry Nacht were bicycling home from dinner on the Hudson River Greenway in Chelsea when an NYPD tow truck turned sharply into the bike lane at 38th Street and 12th Avenue. Despite signs telling drivers to yield to pedestrians and cyclists, the tow truck did not slow down as it headed toward a riverfront tow pound. The truck struck Carl, injuring him severely. He died four days later...

Rather than forsaking cycling after Carl’s death, Mary Beth and her children Zoe and Asher got right back on their bicycles. Perhaps most important, Mary Beth has emerged as an outspoken and eloquent advocate for New York City cyclists. She now serves on the advisory council for Transportation Alternatives, where she is working to create and pass comprehensive complete streets legislation in honor of her husband.


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posted by Joe on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

New York City used to be hostile to cyclists... Toronto now has to emulate them, as evidenced by this video from last Hallowe'en... at least I hope that's why Clarence of Streetfilms is dressed up:
We went back to check in how things were progressing on the NYC DOT’s plans for the 9th Avenue physically separated bike lane. The pleasant surprises continue as lane improvements, ample signage, and cyclist-only bike signals have now appeared making the innovative project even safer. And although driver behavior continues to improve, there are a few problems to highlight.



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posted by Joe on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Moving all of your worldly possessions by human power!



From Streetfilms.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, February 28, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Gotta love the Norwegians. In the hilly town of Trondheim, they wanted to ease the burden for cyclists tackling one of the largest hills in town - so they installed a bikelift (Trampe).



I can think of a couple places one of these would come in handy in Toronto...

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Wow, I want to visit London.

In addition to their mayor pledging a Billion Bucks to cycling infrastructure, those Brits have cool businesses like Velorution, who rent folding bikes to tourists:
“There is no faster way to get around London than by bicycle. Order one of our models and we will deliver it to your room; at the end of the day, just leave it to the concierge and we will pick it up; couldn't be easier. If the weather is not friendly, we can rent you smart weatherproof jackets and trousers.

Don't waste time in traffic jams!” You can choose from a Strida, Brompton, Dahon or even an
iXi. It will set you back £20 for first 24 hours and £15 for subsequent 24 hour periods. The aforementioned wet weather ensemble is an additional £10/day. And should you enjoy the experience, they have a robust collection of folding bikes, including many TH favourites, to tempt your wallet open further.
Velorution has a nice blog too.

More at TreeHugger.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, February 27, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:



Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Thursday, February 14, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Interesting post from Streetsblog recently about the huge differences in cycling policy between Chicago and Los Angeles:
Chicago:

The mayor introduced an ordinance Wednesday that would slap fines ranging from $150 to $500 on motorists who turn left or right in front of someone on a bicycle; pass with less than three feet of space between car and bike; and open a vehicle door into the path of a cyclist.

Daley, an avid rider, said he personally has been involved in unhappy encounters with motorists, providing them with "a few choice words" and "salutes" that he said were delivered "in the Chicago way."

Los Angeles:

"I was born in a Communist country with limited freedoms and rights. When I moved the United States of America, I set foot on this ground and I immediately took possession of basic rights and freedoms. Why is it that when I climb on a bicycle I become a 2nd class citizen and get treated as if I have no rights? Those days end now and I'm claiming my rights!"

More at Streetsblog.

[Chicago Police on Bikes by bcbeatty]

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posted by Joe on Thursday, February 14, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Seattle and Portland are already know as great "green" cities who pay a lot of attention to cyclists, but they're getting even greener with the announcement of green bikelanes and green bikeboxes.

Seattle is getting green bikelanes, using data from Seattle, who has had blue ones for a while:

Portland, which has been using blue lanes for more than 15 years, noted that the lanes have changed motorist and cyclist behaviour but not always for the better.
"City officials videotaped traffic and found that motorists yielded far more often to bikes in marked blue lanes — and that cyclists glanced at cars less often, a problem. Still, drivers and cyclists said the streets seemed safer."
Portland is going even further, changing from blue to green bikelanes (green is the recommended colour for "Colored Bicycle Facilities", according to the U.S.-based National Committee on Uniform Traffic Control Devices), and adding bikeboxes!



In case you are wondering, Toronto did a test-run of some blue colouring in the Strachan Avenue bikelane (where it meets Lakeshore Boulevarde). Unfortunately, the colour came off within days due to a "faulty bonding agent", so this test area will be tried again in the spring.

For a refresher on BikeBoxes, check out BikingToronto's recent video post.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, February 13, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:

Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, February 12, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Imagine Dr. Evil saying "one billion dollars" with a pinky in his mouth to make yourself laugh... it may keep you happy that London, England is devoting $1 billion towards a new bikesharing program (modeled on Paris' Velib) and here in Toronto the annual $100,000 to keep BikeShare going was too much:
London will adopt a bicycle rental scheme similar to a popular initiate in Paris under a $1 billion cycling investment package announced yesterday.

Under the plan, part of a series of environmental measures due in coming days, 6,000 bicycles will be available for rent from stands every 180 metres throughout the city centre.

London, which accounts for seven per cent of Britain's climate-changing carbon emissions and is at the forefront of efforts by major cities around the world to combat global warming, plans to cut carbon emissions by 60 per cent by 2025.

More at the Star.

London is planning more than just a bunch of bikesharing bikes though:

It is a vision in which, for the first time, cycling will be fully funded and officially integrated into the existing transport network. The GLA says this will happen thanks to:
  • A London bike hire scheme, similar to the Velib operation successfully launched in Paris last year, which will make 6,000 bikes available to the public.
  • About a dozen cycling corridors providing safe, easy access to central London for commuters
  • Bike Zones in both inner and outer London aimed at encouraging the use of bikes for short trips to schools, shops and workplaces
  • On-line cycling information encouraging Londoners to make the switch to pedal power
  • Improved bike/rail integration with more cycle parking facilities at stations

More at BikeRadar.

[photo by dartar]

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posted by Joe on Thursday, February 07, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

If I knew more about polo, I'd make some polo-lingo joke about horses, or Prince Charles, and sound intelligent about it. But, since I don't, you get me going right to this article from New York:

Passing by the corner of Chrystie and Broome Sts., one could easily miss the hottest new sporting event in town. That’s because the arena is tucked below ground level in a funky, 7,000-square-foot asphalt pit. Here a bunch of daredevils in jeans and scruffy shirts play a lively game of polo on bicycles, as they circle and glide back and forth at a mesmerizing pace.

Each gripping a mallet with one hand and maneuvering the bike with the other, these athletes skillfully pass and control a street hockey ball in a balancing act that would send most cyclists crashing to the ground.

With this no-frills brand of polo, there is no need for the niceties of equestrian etiquette. These city renegades have custom-built bikes that are perfectly suited to the rider, rather than the horseman having to adapt to a horse with a mind of its own.

Although bike polo was a demonstration sport at the 1908 Olympics, it is only in the last decade that tournaments and teams have sprung up in major cities such as Philadelphia, Boston, Seattle, Chicago, Ottawa, London and Berlin.

More from NYC's Downtown Express.

Yes, in case you are wondering, Bike Polo is alive and well in Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, February 06, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Monday, February 04, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Remember in the fall when City Council approved "Pedestrian Scrambles" for Bloor & Yonge, Bay & Bloor, Yonge & Dundas and Bay & Dundas on a pilot project basis?

A Pedestrian Scramble is when traffic lights in all directions are red so that pedestrians can cross in any direction (even diagonally) without fear of moving car traffic.

Streetsfilms has a new video that illustrates New York's only scramble:



Yeah, red lights in all directions means that cyclists have to stop too.

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posted by Joe on Friday, February 01, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



This Oscar season, the actress of the moment is Ellen Page of Juno.

Turns out, Ellen is a pretty avid cyclist when at home hanging with her fellow Haligonians:
Ellen Page is desperately seeking a bike mechanic. Which might seem strange, because for weeks now she’s had a sedan, complete with tinted windows and a black-suited driver, at her beck and call. It’s just one of the perks of being a Hollywood awards season hopeful. Back home in Nova Scotia, however, her wheels are decidedly less glamorous. “I don’t own a car where I live,” she says. “The way I get around is by foot and by bike."

More at the LA Times.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Monday, January 28, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Yes, it seems like every big city in the world is pursuing sustainable (ie. properly funded, via public-private partnerships) bike sharing systems... except for Toronto - although there are rumours of some re-incarnation of BikeShare - but I have yet to hear anything more than rumours.

Meanwhile, Montreal, who is basing their system on Paris' enormously successful one, is getting a famous designer to make sure everything looks pretty:

Now it seems that we will not only be able to borrow bikes for a small cost, we’ll be doing so in style. This week, Montreal’s parking authority, which will run the program, announced that industrial designer Michel Dallaire will design the bikes and docking stations. ...

Dallaire is really leaving his mark on the city: last fall, he was commissioned to design new street furniture for the downtown area. If the benches, lampposts, bike racks and garbage cans he designed for the Quartier international are any indication, we’ll be treated with a bike sharing system that is sleek, simple and beautifully functional.


More on Spacing Montreal.

[Photo Credit]

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, January 23, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

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posted by Joe on Monday, January 21, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark



Here's an article out of Vancouver about an idea to follow Paris' lead in trading advertising rights in a city in exchange for the running and maintenance of a low-cost bicycle rental organization:

Earlier this year, Paris launched a massive bike-rental scheme involving more than 20,000 bicycles in hundreds of electronic racks around the city. A hit from the start, the Vélib' program attracts tens of thousands of riders each day.

Other cities such as Oslo, Barcelona, Copenhagen and Brussels are already in the mix, and Ladner hopes Vancouver will soon join that list.

"I think we're going to see this everywhere, and I would just love to see it here by 2010," he told The Tyee. "In fact, there's no excuse for us not to have it here by 2010."

More at The Tyee.

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posted by Joe on Monday, January 21, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark


Cop ticketing kid in Japan. photo credit - blasdelf

Here's one downside to bicycles becoming ubiquitous on the streets: with more people using them, governments are more likely to legislate them.

Take this story from Japan:
Japan has new cycling rules come into force this spring that ban cyclists from from holding an open umbrella, listening to music, or talking on a phone. Kids have to wear helmets, and "triple riding"- riding with children in both front and rear seats- is now illegal. Oh, and constantly ringing a bicycle bell while riding on a crowded sidewalk is a no-no. All with fines up to 20,000 yen. (US$183)
Via TreeHugger.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, January 17, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark


Here in Toronto, we keep hearing plans for BikeStations (secure spaces for cyclists to keep their bikes near workplaces or transit stations) for places like Union Station, Nathan Phillips Square and some subway stations.

Until then (I have no doubt they are coming, it's just a matter of time), we can look with admiration at a "private sector solution to problem of secure bike parking" coming out of New York City:
City officials have been trying to create more places where New Yorkers can ride their bikes safely, but finding secure places to park them is an enduring problem.

Now, a few business executives have dreamed up a private-sector solution: the city’s first bikes-only parking lot, complete with attendant. Already, they have cleared the high hurdle of finding available space in Midtown, on West 33rd Street between Eighth and Ninth Avenues.

All they need is a corporation willing to pay as much as $200,000 a year to sponsor the idea.

“We’re really looking for a big number to build something quite spectacular,” said Daniel A. Biederman, president of the 34th Street Partnership. “We want this to be the premier bike parking facility in the country.”


Read more at the New York Times, or CityRoom, their NYC blog.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, January 16, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

From Streetsblog:
For 40 years, Britain's motorists have been the kings of the road, claiming their title through tax discs and fuel duty. But now the balance of power is shifting. There are new pretenders to the throne. Pedestrians and cyclists want equal rights on the road, and this has sparked a war. Our roads are now a battleground.

There are 27 million cars on Britain's roads, an increase of over 5 million in 10 years. But there are also 23 million bicycles fighting with them for road space.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, January 16, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the last week:



Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

A 3 cm scratch turns into a riot in China:


What happened to the Buick you see above didn't happen in the car accident. The woman driving this Buick through Nankai University campus bumped into a bicyclist, leaving her car with a scratch. That was the accident. She got out and demanded an apology, and then demanded payment for damages...

The police came. The driver's mother and brother came. Campus security came. Teachers came. And more -- a lot more -- students came. After the driver's brother assaulted a student who tried to further scratch the Buick, that's when things got, as they say, "blown out of proportion." The amassed students had their way with the car, and a 10-inch scratch turned into something more like a salvage title writeoff.
More on Autoblog.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, January 10, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Via ReadingToronto:
Want to know what a people oriented city looks like? Watch this film and find out. Here is a quote: “In a country where the average income is higher than that of the United States many citizens have chosen the bicycle as their means of transportation because they live better that way.”


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posted by Joe on Wednesday, January 09, 2008 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto. I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across since the last "Elsewhere" post back on Dec. 19:


Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, December 19, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto. I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:



Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, December 18, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

From Streetfilms:
On Sunday we spent the entire day - from 5 AM ’til nearly 5 PM - riding bicycles around the city courtesy of the Ciclovia, a weekly event in which over 70 miles of city streets are closed to traffic where residents come out to walk, bike, run, skate, recreate, picnic, and talk with family, neighbors & strangers…it is simply one of the most moving experiences I have had in my entire life.


It should be noted that the film makers were aided tremendously by Gil Peñalosa, Executive Director of Walk and Bike for Life.

Walk and Bike for Life is based in Oakville, Ontario.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, December 13, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Want a cool bike video from Copenhagen with a funky Eurobeat soundtrack with spoken lyrics in another language? It might be Danish, but I'm not sure.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, December 13, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

What's it look like when about a third of a city's commuters go by bike? This video is of a major cycling route in Copenhagen that sees more than 25,000 cyclists a day (the entire city of about 1.7 million has more than 500,000 bike commuters).

Great bike infrastructure begets more people on bikes...

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, December 12, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto. I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:





Past Weekly Elsewhere Posts:

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posted by Joe on Tuesday, December 11, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

The last thing you may expect from a beer company:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, December 05, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto. I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:

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posted by Joe on Monday, December 03, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Last week, TreeHugger paid some attention to the whole "parking in bike lanes issue" and brought attention to a new site called I Parked In A Bike Lane.org which takes the complaining about motor vehicles in bikelanes to a whole new level:


"I Parked In A Bike Lane.org is a humble movement aimed at raising driver awareness towards the problems associated with blocking bike lanes. Cyclists know how unsafe this can be, but something about being hulled up inside two tons of steel seems to lead to an obliviousness (or perhaps indifference) to these issues."


I like the mybikelane idea of taking photos of bikelane parkers, and the idea of putting a little flier on someone's windshield to educate them on what they are doing wrong, but wonder if actually vandalizing their car is effective at all.

Yes, there will be a lasting reminder of parking in a bikelane, but actions like this will just create animosity towards cyclists and their rights, not support.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, November 28, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto. I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:




Past "Elsewhere" Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, November 21, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto. I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page.

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:

SF: Bike safety marketing examples



China: 40 Million Electric Bikes Spark Environmental Dilemma

Portland: Donations large and small kick-start bike safety fund

USA: Bicycle Neglect (Sightline Institute)

UK: Cars out as London mayor clears way for Paris-style plage and cycle boulevards



Portland: Concepts for bike boxes, intersection improvements



DC: More people biking to transit

NYC Installing Sleek New Bike Parking Shelters



NYC: The Green Prince Street Bike Lane Has Arrived

NYC: Stolen Bike Rescued by Online Geeks

Pittsburgh: Bicycle-Pedestrian Bridge over Monongahela River Opening

Portland: We Are ALL Traffic Rally



Past "Around the World" Weekly Posts:

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, November 14, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto (believe it or not!).

I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page (scroll down a bit), but in case you missed it, here's a post about it. :)

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:
NYC: Crosstown Bike Lanes Remain in the Crosshairs



NYC: Fort Greene Bike Lanes & Traffic-Calming

When in Rome, Share Bikes

Amsterdam: Cyclists Always Get the Green Light

Washington, DC: Women's Garden Biking Tour



London: 10,000 New Bike Parking Spaces for London Schools



NYC: New Lower Manhattan Crosstown Bike Route



NYC: Gridlocked Streets Are “Not a Law of Nature”



NYC: For the Best in Transportainment, Try a Pedicab

Portland: Family cycling: The next Big Thing?

NYC: Shared Space on the Brooklyn Bridge

You can see last week's version of this post too:
Cycling News from Around the World - Wed. Nov. 7th

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, November 07, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark


New Yorkers are getting sharrows, bikeboxes and "buffered" bikelanes!
[photo from Streetsblog]

Cool biking stuff happens in tons of places besides Toronto (believe it or not!).

I try to link to this "Elsewhere" stuff in the sidebar of this page, but in case you missed it, here's a post about it. :)

Here's some news, views, and inspirations that I've come across in the past week:

Copenhagen: Bicycles Outnumber Cars During Morning Rush Hour

Proposed "Cycle Tunnel" in Norway

NYC: An Interview with Jan Gehl

Portland: The "Bikes vs. Cars" Debate

London: Did the Congestion Charge Drive us to Cycling?

Portland: New York Times notices Portland's bike culture

Netherlands: The Amazing Bike Dispensing Machine

NYC: Half of Manhattan Trips Could be Done by Bike

Bike Pittsburgh puts out new map for two-wheelers

NYC: New Bike Lanes and Sharrows Lead to the Brooklyn Bridge
NYC: Bicyclists Suing City Over Critical Mass Arrests

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, October 24, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



Hot on the heels of Paris' enormously successful quick and easy bike rental scheme, comes news of the first Canadian city seriously looking at it too:
"Montreal wants to be the bicycle city par excellence in North America and this project will definitely help us get there," ... The idea is to encourage Montrealers and tourists to use the public bicycles instead of cars for short, inner city trips, allowing them to pick up a bike at one station, use it for half an hour or an hour, and then drop it off at any other station of their choice.

The city has commissioned Stationnement Montreal, a subsidiary of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Montreal, to design and execute the bike rental system. The company, which currently manages the city's paid on-street and public parking lots, will invest $15 million to get the project up and running, and expects to eventually recoup these costs.
I must say that it is inspired - getting the Parking people to run it - especially since it looks like it'll be a moneymaker.

I can see Toronto commissioning the Toronto Parking Authority to do it... can you?

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

South of the border, if you commute to work by bike now, you get tax benefits:
Last Saturday the House of Representatives passed Energy Independence legislation that amends a section of the IRS code to include “bicycles” in the definition of transportation covered by the qualified transportation fringe benefit.

Introduced earlier this year by Congressman Earl Blumenauer as H.R. 1498, the provision calls for a $20 monthly benefit for riding a bike to work.

It wasn't easy getting this passed down in the U.S. of A., as the provision was met with opposition and ridicule in the House of Representatives, not least of which was "Rep. Patrick McHenry (R-NC) who said bicycles were a, “19th century solution to a 21st century problem.”"

Someone YouTubed (is that a verb) McHenry's speech in all of it's glory:


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posted by Joe on Tuesday, September 11, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

When is Toronto going to embrace bikesharing as a good and economic policy to encourage people to get out of their cars?

We hear about Paris' successful bike rental program Velib a lot... there's another in Brussels run by the same advertising company:

Brussels has embraced a project allowing residents and tourists to rent a bike for a modest fee. Beyond the environmental benefit, tourists find this an exciting and inexpensive way to discover the city.

The introductory project has about 250 bikes, located at 25 sites, with fees starting at about 0.50 euros for half an hour, rising to 1.50 euros for a day.

It's sponsored by JCDecaux, a billboard advertising company. The Brussels program piggybacks on other similar initiatives, including one in the French city of Lyon, where 2,500 bikes are available for hire.

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posted by Joe on Friday, August 24, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



You've heard of physically seperate bikelanes, right? It's when the bikelane-makers put some kind of barrier on the side of a bikelane to make them nice and safe.

A good example would be the Quay to the City lanes from last summer, which is the photo above (when are these going to be permanently installed, already? Wasn't work supposed to start this summer?!?!)

New York has their own version of them ... they're buffered - with a diagonally striped section of road between the bikelane and carlanes... and New Yorkers LOVE them!
Bike lanes that separate bicyclists from motor vehicle traffic are safer and encourage more bicycling, according to a recent survey by Transportation Alternatives. The survey of 147 cyclists was conducted along the 8th Avenue bike lane in Manhattan, one of the few bike paths to integrate both “buffered” and “unbuffered” segments.

Transportation Alternatives found:
  • Buffered bike lanes are are perceived as being safer than conventional lanes.
    52% of respondents feel safe in buffered lanes, versus only 21% in conventional bike lanes. Conventional bike lanes are more dangerous than buffered lanes -- 44% of respondents find the conventional lanes dangerous or intolerable, versus only 19% of respondents surveyed on buffered lanes.
  • Buffered or not, bike lanes encourage more bicycling.
    Seven out of ten cyclists use 8th Avenue more often since the lane was installed.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, August 23, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark


When less than half the residents of a city own a car, there’s got to be folks looking for another alternative to hoofing it… And that’s precisely what’s happened with the bicycle in Berlin over the last twenty years, as it has become completely common for the average resident to ride a bicycle every day of the week. In fact, they’ve come to dominate the flow of traffic at intersections, as cars now even yield to bikes in that city!

And while it’s true that the city has invested a significant amount of energy in cycling lanes and the like to make it as bike-friendly as possible, the trend toward cycling has also meant there’s now safety in numbers. As filmmaker Ted White and bike designer George Bliss noted while spending time filming in China, at certain unmarked intersections cars just completely ignore cyclists on the side of the road waiting to cross until a certain “critical mass” of them accumulate. That critical number seems to make it safe for all of them to cross, as the motorized vehicles come to a stop and let them all head safely to the other side without a fight.
[via:: CBS News and treehugger, photo credit - zakkaliciousness]

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posted by Joe on Thursday, August 16, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



Matt Blankett posted today about Vancouver's bike infrastructure, a great post that pointed out some easy things Toronto could be doing to make cyclists feel more valuable on our streets:
Vancouver does a number of smart and simple things to prioritize cycling that should the politicians and civil servants of Toronto feel jolts of shame. One of the first things I noticed was that the cyclist symbol was included on the button to trigger an intersection stop light to change ...

Cycling advocates like to use the phrase, “we are traffic!” when drivers accuse them of blocking their flow of traffic. To validate cyclists’ assertion that they are indeed part of road traffic Vancouver uses a bike waiting area at a few major intersections (photo below). It is reminiscent of what happens at intersections of major Asian cities where scooters make their way to the front of the traffic queue.
Great post Matt!

[photo credit: Spacing Wire]

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posted by Joe on Thursday, August 16, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



Really cool article in the Guardian newspaper about the Paris Velib bikesharing program and what it's doing to Paris:
No doubt the Tour de France helped, but when my rather substantial friend Jean, who has never knowingly walked more than 100m without the promise of a four-course meal at the end of it, began to trumpet the joys of cycling, I knew something profound was happening to the Parisian psyche. One month after its launch, Paris's Vélib', or "freedom bike" scheme, has turned the city cycling mad.
...
But the increase in people cycling does seem to be boosting bike awareness and challenging the car mentality. Paris, with its wide streets, is already a better city for cyclists than London. And no, you don't wear shorts, helmet or pollution mask; most people prefer a suit or high heels. Blase cyclists can be seen negotiating the high-speed free-for-all that is the Place de la Concorde while puffing a cigarette and calling a friend.
It's being done in countless other cities, and it can be done here too.

[via Wheels of Justice, photo from Transit Miami]

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posted by Joe on Monday, August 13, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



There's always hysteria about how streets are dangerous, with many public safety advocates always, well, advocating for things like separating cars from bikes from pedestrians... which results in our streetscapes being overwhelmed by cars and trucks (since they can kill people) while cyclists and pedestrians are relegated to the sidelines to fight over the scraps.

But what anyone who has seen "public safety" features removed can tell you, it actually improves safety because drivers become more freaked out that cyclists and pedestrians could come out in front of them, and so they drive slower, as has recently happened in London:

Accident levels have almost halved in a London street where "safety" equipment such as guard rails, white lines and signposts were stripped out.

The redesign of Kensington High Street has been such a success that the "naked road" concept is set to be rolled out to other cities in Britain and around the world.

Engineers removed railings, scores of signposts and combined traffic lights with lamp posts to reduce clutter.

They cleared the road surface of superfluous white lines, re- aligned the kerb to follow the line of shop frontages and junked the different coloured surface materials used by other councils.

Now Kensington and Chelsea council aims to capitalise on its success by pressing ahead with a major new road scheme near South Kensington Tube station a key stepping stone towards a multi- million-pound redevelopment of Exhibition Road.

In spite of warnings from the Department for Transport that the scheme would worsen safety, figures obtained by the Standard show that the number of accidents in Kensington High Street has fallen from 71 a year to just 40 a drop of nearly 44 per cent.

Give motorists wide roads with barriers separating them from other modes of transport, and it seems they turn into speedfreaks.

Maybe David Engwicht is right about why bikelanes are inherently unsafe?

[story via and photo by: Streetsblog]

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posted by Joe on Monday, August 13, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark


Really neat story from Streetsblog about "minibuses" being used in Paris:
Paris is also building new "microbus" lines that circulate through neighborhood streets delivering commuters to subways, trains and major bus lines. "The toyish vehicles," Nadal says, "are almost as fun as the old street cars." The have low floors and wide sliding doors that allow simultaneous boarding and alighting. The microbuses hold up to 22 passengers, 10 seated, 12 standing and room for one wheelchair.
Great idea for a cheaper way to get auto-free transportation to all those Greater Toronto neighbourhoods of crescents and cul-de-sacs.

[photo credit: Streetsblog]

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posted by Joe on Monday, August 13, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



The new Velib bikesharing program in Paris has been so successful that Portland OR is putting out a RFP (Request for Proposals) to get a similar thing going there:

The RFP description says Portland wants to,

“Evaluate the possibility of hiring a Contractor to operate a public bicycle rental service…The City is seeking proposals from firms, teams or contractors interested in the delivery and operation of a bicycle fleet for rent to the general public and stationed in the public right of way to further promote the City’s use of a multi-modal public transportation system with a focus on the City’s core area.”

New York is pushing for something similar too.

How about Toronto?

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posted by Joe on Friday, August 10, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

The City of Toronto keeps talking about accelerating the Bike Plan, but we'll see what happens. I am thinking positively about it. Other cycling advocates aren't happy with anything that happens, but I don't fall into that camp.

Meanwhile, New York's government is accelerating their plans for an environmentally friendly city. Along with making lanes on city streets bus only, planning on a congestion charge, increasing bike parking, they are also planning on doubling the amount of new bikelanes added in the next two years, from 200 to 400 miles:

As Mayor Bloomberg's congestion pricing proposal inches its way through Albany gridlock, the city has put on the fast track its Bike Master Plan by moving to double the number of city bike lanes to 400 miles from 200 over the next two years.

About 130,000 cyclists hit the streets every day, and the city is seeing an unprecedented surge in the number of bikers, according to statistics provided by Transportation Alternatives.

The number of daily commuters who ride bikes to work, however, is less than 1% of total commuters, a figure that city officials say they want to increase by making cycling safer and more appealing on the potholed, congested streets.

In case you're wondering, the 200 miles per year works out to 320 km/year.

Toronto has 28 km planned for 2007. Let's step up. :)

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posted by Joe on Friday, August 10, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

A Canadian's impressions of Madison, Wisconsin... which seems to be right up there with Davis, California in terms of bike-friendliness:
For someone accustomed to a growing web of bike facilities at home in Victoria, Madison was a revelation. Fifteen years of U.S. federal gas tax funding helped Madison build an impressive network of trails and on-road bike lanes, with more bike racks than the Amsterdam train station.
Madison must be fantastic... the writer is from Victoria, B.C., which is supposed to be one of the most bike-friendly places in Canada.

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posted by Joe on Thursday, August 09, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

I last mentioned BikeStations back in June (about an article about Toronto emulating Chicago), and I see they are now looking to open a BikeStation in Portland, OR:
White is especially excited by the recent interest of private developers.


She says the end result of all the discussions could range from a full-service, fully staffed facility to a partially or unstaffed and completely automated underground parking system.

White says BikeStation doesn’t push a one-size-fits-all approach. Instead, they will work with Portland to come up with whatever bike-parking solution serves the city’s needs most effectively.

For instance, she wonders if it might make more sense to have a “hub and satellite system that all users can access,” instead of just one main facility.


No telling when the Nathan Phillips Square one will open.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Dr. Anne Lusk of Harvard's School of Public Health is so enamoured with what she calls "Cycle Tracks" that the Washington Post is writing about it:
She'd like to equip [American cities] with cycle tracks.

Cycle tracks? Does she mean the painted buffer lane for bikes you see on some streets? No! Those lanes are easily blocked by vehicles attempting to park. And they leave cyclists within inches of fast cars and monster trucks; if there's any error, you know who get hurts, often badly.

Cycle tracks, notes Lusk, are actually a separated part of the roadway yet distinct from the roadway, distinct from the sidewalk. In their purest form -- Odense, Denmark, where 50 percent of all city journeys are by bicycle -- the paths even have their own traffic signals.

What actually separates the cycle track? It can be a long, narrow curb. Or a line of cones or concrete barriers. Or metal stanchions. Or a line of trees and other vegetation (an on-street greenway).
The above photo is from Copenhagen, but similar things exist in Montreal too.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

David Engwicht has been called the father of traffic calming. This is the guy who set up his living room in the middle of the street. He has a ton of great ideas about making streets safer.

It may be surprising to you that he is not the biggest fan bikelanes, arguing that they don't make roads safer, but rather, more dangerous:

At first glance it seems self-evident that bike lanes automatically make streets safer for cyclists. It is common knowledge that the wider the traffic lane, the faster a motorist will tend to go…The narrower a passage way the slower we tend to go because there is not the same margin for error…

But there is a contradictory psychological impact of bike lanes. They deliver greater certainty to the driver. The driver knows exactly which is the cyclists’ space and which is their space. This increased certainty about where the cyclist will be in the roadway encourages the motorist to speed up…

But there is another interesting set of contradictory factors when it comes to bike lanes. Bike lanes change the perceptions of the cyclist. Cyclists feel safer because they no longer have to share a space with motorists. But…this is to some extent a false sense of security…when bike lanes are present, motorists impose greater risks on the cyclists, for example, driving closer to the cyclist when passing. Does this mean that accident rates go up after the bike lane goes in? Not necessarily. Because the cyclists feel safer, more of them cycle on that street.

It makes sense right up until the very last sentence. Although bikelanes may in fact be initially more dangerous for the false sense of security they give both drivers and cyclists, the fact that bikelanes increase cyclist numbers makes them safer. More cyclists on bikelaned streets means more cyclists on non-bikelaned streets. This forces drivers to be careful and more mindful of cyclists.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

I've been sort of following the whole congestion charge issue that's being discussed in New York via Streetsblog. Basically, it boils down to New York Mayor Mike Bloomberg and a lot of community groups arguing for a congestion charge (to alleviate traffic congestion, spur economic activity, raise money for the transit system and help the environment) against politicians and community groups who whined about parking problems outside the congestion zone and the "taxing of the poor" (although if you know anything about New York, you know that the poor are not driving cars in Manhatten).

>Anyways, after the Congestion Charge seemed to be dead in the New York State Assembly in Albany, the Mayor and his opponents came to a kind of deal, which basically allows for New York to install a congestion charge, given that they get lots of "okays" from the State Assembly at various points in the process.

Toronto desperately needs a congestion charge to alleviate congestion, spur economic activity, raise money for public transit and help the environment. It would be so easy to do downtown, within a 10 minute walk of all the downtown subways stations... $2, say, to drive your car into the congestion zone.

That $2 gets put into running and expanding the TTC. What a concept.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

ReadingToronto is one of my favourite Toronto websites. Not only for the quality of writing about Toronto-centric issues, but for the variety of information it covers. Still one of my favourite blog posts ever is Escape Velocity... about the feeling of escaping gravity as one rides through a city.

Back in July, Robert Oulette of ReadingToronto visited Denmark and Sweden and has an excellent post about the bike-friendly infrastructure there:

In Sweden and Denmark civic authorities have done something exceptional: they designed cities for walking and cycling. This image is of a biking and walking path down a boulevard in Gothenberg. Cyclists have their own lanes on roads - real lanes with real stop lights of their own. Imagine.



I'm jealous.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Ahh, Portland. The city government there co-ordinated a bunch of "Share the Path" events to educate cyclists, rollerbladers and pedestrians about sharing pathways with other road users:

Near the intersection with SE Grand Ave., Janis McDonald, Margaret Weddell, Stephanie Routh and Thomas Rousculp held up signs with messages like, “Don’t be a silent passer,” and “Bell free? Free bells ahead.”


On the west end of the bridge, employees of the Bike Gallery gave cyclists free tune-ups, installed “I love my bike” bike bells, and offered hot Peets coffee and muffins.

The Bike Gallery crew worked with the precision of a NASCAR pit crew; pumping up tires, adjusting brakes, and screwing on new bike bells.

What a great idea. Multi-use paths in Toronto can be disasters (try the Beaches on a holiday weekend!), between spandex cyclists doing time trails (which is totally inappropriate on park paths) and adults, kids and dogs all over the place (especially when there are sometimes seperate pedestrian-only paths).

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Ever wonder what was beyond the mist and haze of Niagara Falls?

It's Buffalo, and it's a great cycling city, according to the Buffalo News:
As I was heading home on my 10- speed, looking out at a gorgeous sun setting over the Niagara River, I grumbled at how Buffalo never makes those magazine lists of perfect cycling towns. It’s their loss.

It’s true we don’t have a lot of bicycle commuters. Our winters are too long, our springs too short – summer and fall are just right – and while we have a growing number of bike paths, far too many are strewn with broken glass.

But from my house near Delaware Park, it’s a short trip to ride along the mighty Niagara, extend it to take in breathtaking views of the rapids and the falls themselves or do a loop around Grand Island.

[The original article seems to have been taken down, so thankfully the BikeBlog from Buffalo copied the article]

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Good looking new movie about surviving (and thriving?) in Los Angeles without a car is on it's way. Hopefully it'll get a big distribution deal so it'll be seen by lots of people.
Katie’s eighty days finished on January 1, 2007…No carbon was emitted into the atmosphere during the production of this film – not by Katie, not by the cast, crew, or producer. Everyone involved rode the bus, carpooled, walked or biked, gear in hand, or in backpack!
[via Treadly and Me]

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, August 08, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Jonathon Maus over on BikePortland.org has a great forum on the site, and there's a pretty active thread about wearing / not wearing helmets while biking:

from “wsbob”:

“…cyclists chances of coming out of a fall or crash in better condition while wearing a helmet seem likely to be far better than without one…”

from “tfahrner”:

“…I don’t wear a helmet often because I don’t believe that non-sport-oriented bicycling on quiet routes about town is sufficiently dangerous to warrant such precautionary measures. I am particularly averse to instilling or reinforcing in the minds of others the ideas that (a) bicycling thus conceived is dangerous enough to require body armor and (b) any dangers that exist in public space are the responsibility of the potential victims to compensate for…”

from “aaron”:

“..if there is going to be a helmet law, then the helmets should be made better and car drivers and passengers should also be required to wear them too…”

Go and check it out for lots of pro and anti arguments about helmet use.


[photo credit: BikePortland.org]

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posted by Joe on Thursday, July 19, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark



I think every cyclist has a yearning to go to Europe, to see what bike-friendly cities look like first-hand.

The Amsterdam Central Train Station Bike Garage (Architecture Week article) is probably the most photographed parking garage in the world. It was designed specifically for parking 2500 bikes.

But what happens when you can't find your ONE bike in that 2500? The Star has re-printed a Washington Post article about that.

Mary Frances Cullen – Irish, 63, with dyed auburn hair and quick green eyes – sees the lost-bike frenzy dozens of times a day.

Unlike automobile drivers, cyclists don't have keys with panic buttons. At Amsterdam Central, they have Cullen and her crew of bike attendants.

Cullen, who wears a neon lime-green vest, works out of a yellow box on the first floor to help bicyclists in distress. Before this job, she spent eight years causing bikers distress: She was on the city squad that rounded up illegally parked bikes from bridges, lampposts and sidewalks and hauled them to the bicycle pound outside town.

Anyone else thinking that Union Station needs something like this? All those commuters coming in on GO Trains can hop on a bike to get to their downtown office jobs.

[photo credit]

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posted by Joe on Thursday, July 19, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

I originally saw this on SFist (sister site of Torontoist) - but it looks like the YouTube video has been taken down, so I tracked down another version of it for you. Apparently a car driver drove right into a Critical Mass crowd, crushing 3 bikes and injuring 2 people.

It's rather disturbing, but if you want to watch:



Especially disturbing is the fact that although the cyclists asked police to press charges against the driver, the police refused. The police also refused to interview other drivers who said the driver was at fault and only interviewed other people in the offending vehicle.

I just noticed that this happened back in mid-May... but the Bicycle Civil Liberties Union has a lot of media links about it. Apparently, most coverage was not favourable towards the cyclists.

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posted by Joe on Wednesday, July 18, 2007 Share/Save/Bookmark

Jim Caple of ESPN (which is apparently known for poor cycling coverage) has a piece called 10 reasons you'll want to watch this year's Tour de France. Number 10 is Bicycles are the new SUV:
More importantly, it's good for you, good for the environment and good for the country. Who is more patriotic, the person who commutes to work on a bike, or the guy who slaps a U.S. flag decal on his SUV that gets 12 miles per gallon?
Buying gas gets soldiers killed.

This counts for Canadians in Afghanistan too. We're there because terrorists drove planes into the World Trade Centre, because they've long been upset that western countries have been stationing troops in their countries for easy access to oil.

[via Commute by Bike]

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